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 Gold Classifiers 

Gold classifiers, also called sieves or screens, go hand in hand with a gold pan. Designed to fit on the top of 5 gallon plastic buckets used by most prospectors, and over most gold pans, the classifier's job is to screen out larger rocks and debris before you pan the material. Classifiers come in a variety of mesh sizes. The mesh refers to the screen size. For example, a 1/2 inch mesh is about 4 holes per square inch; a 1/4 inch mesh has about 16 holes per square inch; 1/8 inch contains about 64 holes per square inch and so on. 1/100 inch is the smallest mesh that is commonly used for microscopic gold recovery and ultra fine gold dust and flakes. High quality gold classifiers found on this page are made by Jobe and Garrett. Also check out the Earthquake Vibrating Classifier!  Click here for gold pans and gold panning kits.
    JOBE Stainless Steel Classifiers
    Price:
    $23.95
    Stainless Steel Classifiers  Item 6402
    Price:
    $14.95
    Item: Jobe General Classifier
    Garrett 14
    Price:
    $7.95
    Garrett 14" Sifter/Classifier #1650200
    Price:
    $9.95

    8 In Stainless Bowl Style Classifier


    Save your poor tired back! No stooping, squatting, bending or bucket shaking required with the "Earthquake" vibrating bucket gold classifier! Built with a UV and water resistant coating, the sturdy Earthquake is extremely effective for screening both desert and river material, and has been tested using bucket style classifiers from 1/2 inch through 100 mesh screens.

     The Earthquake will classify a 5 gallon bucket of dry or wet material in 3 to 5 minutes— just add your own classifiers and a battery and you are ready to get the GOLD without a lot of muscle power!

    Did you know?  Gold has served as the most important monetary standard throughout history. It is measured in troy ounces and the price of gold is typically stated in terms of the cost of one troy ounce. Historically, the USA has fixed the price of gold. An ounce was fixed at $20 from 1786 until 1934, at which time the price was raised to $35 per ounce. In 1968, a two-tiered pricing structure was implemented, and by 1975 the price of gold was allowed to fluctuate. Back on January 21, 1980 the price of gold reached a peak of $850 and everyone went crazy thinking it wouldn't get better than that. But it sure has!