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Sunday, December 30 2018

When prospecting an area that’s known for gold, put yourself in the boots of the old-timers who came before togold indicators help you decide where to begin. Look at your site from all directions and think about what they could and could not do way back then. Your modern-day equipment and knowledge are a lot more advanced than what they had to work with, so you’re already a step ahead! Many times miners jumped in with both feet and started mining to beat the other guys. But being in a hurry meant they could have missed a lot, or moved on too quickly from their original discovery before it was completely worked out. Considering the lay of the land will reveal important clues that can help you better formulate a plan when you're out in the field. Here’s what to look for:

Host rock (or bedrock) could be shale, diorite, granite, quartz, clay or other material. Keep an eye out for changes in the area’s host rock and notice the direction in which it’s running.

Contact zones occur when a rock or mineral cuts or crosses the host rock. Generally, gold is deposited along contact zones, which can be a few inches or several hundred feet wide. If bedrock in your area runs north to south and you notice a color change in material that runs east to west, you’ve found a contact zone.

Outcroppings are a lump of high ground with weather-worn rocks which are generally rounded and usually situated on ridges, but can be located anywhere. Especially look for iron staining on outcroppings.

Ditch lines of yesteryear were generally dug into and run along somewhat level ground. Very close to diggings, especially in hilly or steep terrain, they may have been cut loose to wash downhill.  Follow the old water ditches and see where they end up.

Exploratory trenches were not used for water but most of the time were deeper and would often circumnavigate a rich area that may be throwing gold from clay lines, pockets, quartz seams and any other local contacts. Trenches were dug simply to expose any contacts that may be present. As a contact was crossed, old-timers checked it out in both directions for values.

Rock cairns are piles of rock or stone used for claim corners. Standing high on a slope looking down is a great vantage point from which to spot cairns and other man-made landmarks. By locating a historic claim, you definitely have a great place to begin! 

Posted by: Denise AT 12:31 pm   |  Permalink   |  Email
Friday, December 02 2016

Metal detectors are electromagnetic devices and can detect items that are conductive or magnetic, or both. Gold is an example of a non-magnetic conductive item. Iron is both conductive and magnetic. Almost all major advances in prospecting metal detectors over the last 40 years revolve around improving ways to ignore and see through ground mineralization while still finding gold nuggets. If you’re using any brand of VLF (very low frequency) metal detector to prospect for gold, choosing the correct operating mode (also called search mode) can make or break your success.

Experts recommend that any metal detector you are considering for gold prospecting should have a true all metal mode. This mode is important because of its lack of filtering applied to the signal. It will normally offer the best depth and the best sensitivity to small gold. Unfortunately, two common problems occur when using All Metal Mode: interference from ferrous iron and steel junk, and from hot rocks. A hot rock is nothing more than a rock that has a different magnetic content than the ground. Some rocks are that way because they contain conductive minerals besides gold. The Discrimination knob on your detector will help with these two problems.

Discrimination is a type of electronic filtering. The signal is analyzed, and depending on the discrimination setting, identified as either a target to be dug or a target to be ignored. Applying more discrimination eliminates more trash, but be careful—you don’t want to completely eliminate all ferrous trash because an aggressive level of discrimination easily tunes out gold. So be prepared to still dig ferrous junk which usually turns out to be larger chunks of steel and iron. Also know that discrimination circuits can be fooled, especially in ground with lots of iron mineralization. This ground condition can override the small gold signal and cause a faint gold signal to be identified as ferrous. Even with this limitation, the discrimination mode can be invaluable for finding gold in extremely trashy areas. Trashy areas are where a VLF detector can really outshine a PI (pulse induction) machine, especially when dealing with nails, bits of rusted cans, and other small trash. If you’re in the market for a metal detector, some manufacturers offer special holiday packages such as the 3 listed below. You can also shop for Fisher, Garrett, Bounty Hunter, Minelab, Tesoro and Teknetics metal detectors here.

Through Christmas only... FREE Recharge Kit and FREE 15” Coil and FREE Shipping with purchase of either Fisher F75 ($599) or Teknetics T2 ($499) detectors! Both machines are recommended for Coin Shooting, Relic Hunting, and Gold Prospecting.

Teknetics T2 metal detector     Fisher

Garrett AT Pro holiday package ($594.96) includes detector, headphones, instructional DVD,
backpack, digger pouch, cap, and coil cover and also SHIPS FREE!

Posted by: Denise AT 12:52 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Monday, April 27 2015

What is the best metal detector? This is probably the Number One question that everyone asks when Fisher metal detectorbuying their first detector. No one wants to waste their time and money so they want to know what's "best" right from the start. That's understandable, but unfortunately there is no one single answer. The easiest way to find the "best" detector for YOU is to evaluate YOUR detecting style, YOUR experience level, what items YOU hope to find, and the time that YOU will spend metal detecting. After taking all of these things into consideration, then you will be able to find a metal detector that fits your needs and your budget. To make the purchasing process easier, answer these questions:

How much do you know about metal detectors? Be honest because the answer also affects your budget. If you're just getting started and plan to go out just a few weekends a year, you may not want to shell out a lot of cash up front so a general all-purpose detector in the $200 range will suit your needs. If you have used a friend's detector a few times and are fairly serious about wanting to find gold and other buried treasures of your own, then buy a detector in the $700 range that is user-friendly. You will get a very good quality machine with plenty of bells and whistles, yet it won't require an advanced degree to actually use it. And you won't have to spend hours reading the owners' manual to understand it either. Before investing in a model that costs thousands of dollars, first be sure you love detecting and will use it often enough to justify the big price tag no matter what brand you decide on. Garrett and Fisher are two of the oldest manufacturers in the business.

Garrett AT GoldWhere do you plan to detect? Deserts, rivers, parks, and saltwater beaches all have very different ground conditions. If you prefer to be in deep water, you'll want a submersible detector. If you plan to hunt around the shoreline, then you don't have to worry about the entire detector being waterproof, just the coil. If you will be in city parks and other areas where overhead power lines are the norm, then a very low frequency (VLF) detector will be your best bet. If you plan to hunt mostly in heavily mineralized areas, consider a pulse induction (PI) machine for best results. Keep in mind that just changing the search coil on your metal detector can be the next best thing to buying a whole new machine without spending a lot of money! Most metal detectors come with a standard search coil that is good for general use – finding the broadest range of targets in the broadest range of environments. But search coils come in all shapes and sizes, and it's possible that merely changing the coil on your detector will lead you to a host of new targets.

What do you primarily hope to find? If you want to find gold, you'll need a detector especially made for that purpose. Gold detectors are not necessarily more expensive, but they are built with a higher sensitivity to detecting gold nuggets, and have better ground balancing and discrimination abilities. PI machines aren't so good for coin shooting in urban areas where you are likely to encounter iron trash, however, they are ideal for beaches or detecting in other highly mineralized soils, especially if you are looking for objects that are deeply buried. VLF detectors are more sensitive to finding the smallest bits of gold, but do not as easily cancel out ground mineralization.

Bounty Hunter metal detectorMetal detecting is one of the easiest, most profitable, and fun ways to find gold and other metallic treasures such as coins, jewelry, and relics. It's so easy to have your metal detector ready to go in its carry bag with extra coils, a digger or scoop, headphones, and spare batteries. Just grab and go! There are many thousands of passionate detectorists around the world already enjoying the rewarding outdoor activity of metal detecting. If you want to join their ranks, please keep the following in mind:

Metal Detectorist Code of Ethics

  • Always check federal, state, county and local laws before using your metal detector. It is your responsibility to “know the law.”
  • Abide by all laws, ordinances or regulations that may govern metal detecting in the area you will be in.
  • Never trespass. Always obtain permission prior to entering private property, mineral claims, or underwater salvage leases.
  • Do not damage, deface, destroy, or vandalize any property (including: ghost towns and deserted structures), and never tamper with any equipment at the site.
  • Never litter. Always pack out what you take in, and remove all trash your metal detector uncovers during your search.
  • Fill all holes, regardless how remote the location, and never dig in a way that will damage, be damaging to, or kill any vegetation.
  • Do not build fires, camp or park in non-designated or restricted areas.
  • Leave all gates and other accesses to land as found.
  • Never contaminate wells, creeks, or any other water supplies.
  • Be courteous, considerate, and thoughtful at all times when metal detecting.
  • Report the discovery of any items of historic significance you find with your metal detector to the local historical society or proper authorities.
  • Uphold all finders, search and salvage agreements.
  • Promote responsible historical research and artifact recovery, and the sharing of knowledge with others.
Posted by: Denise AT 06:45 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Monday, January 19 2015

Garrett ATX Metal Detector Deepseeker Pack Garrett's new pulse induction ATX metal detector is the ultimate multi-frequency detector for all terrains and extreme conditions (highly mineralized ground, saltwater, etc.). It features advanced pulse induction technology, a durable design that meets military specifications, and an advanced 20 inch Deepseeker searchcoil is ideal for use in searching for caches and other deeply buried large objects. The ATX is waterproof to 10 feet.

PI (pulse induction) detectors work a bit differently than the more common VLF (very low frequency) detectors by putting magnetic field energy into the ground and then switching off and waiting a short period before they start to look for a response. This makes them better at handling ground mineralization than a VLF detector because during that short delay the magnetic response of iron trash minerals that you don't want to find dies out. VLF detectors do not as easily cancel out ground mineralization the way a PI metal detector can do.

Kevin Hoagland, Executive Director of Development for the Gold Prospectors Association of America recently field tested the Garrett ATX Deepseeker. Below is an excerpt of Kevin's review:

"My first impression of the ATX was that it's compact, heavy and built like a tank, and all connections are waterproof. Battery installation is simple. The ATX uses 8 AA batteries in two 4-battery drop-in packs and comes with an 8-slot AA battery charger. Not only does this detector come with a rugged case and carry bag, but also everything else you need to get out detecting. The units ships with the 20 inch mono coil already installed. It is also shipped with headphones that are screwed into the back of the unit.

I slipped my arm into the adjustable cuff, and grabbed the control pod. There was no unnecessary torque on Garrett ATX Detectormy wrist, which gave it a perfect fit and feel, and allowed me to work all of the control buttons easily with my thumb. I pushed the unit out in front of me a bit and turned on the power switch, which is located on the back of the unit. The Garrett ATX Deepseeker Metal Detector goes through its startup and self-diagnostic test. Every light on the control pad comes on and unit emits several different sounds before settling into a comfortable, but high, threshold. This is not a turn-on-and-go detector. Either read the entire owners manual before you go out hunting, or at least read the first two pages of the manual— page 1 is the Quick Start Guide and an explanation of how to access the functions of the ATX quickly, and page 2 shows you where to find more information concerning those functions.

Garrett ATX Deepseeker Metal Detector There are 5 major functions that are completely user-adjustable: Mode, Sensitivity, Threshold, Volume, and Ground Balance. Are functions are easy to adjust with a basic understanding of the ATX and more tunable as you become more proficient. Secondary functions include iron check, tracking, discrimmination and frequency shifting, to name only a few.

As with most large PI detectors, the Garrett ATX Deepseeker Metal Detector is not light, and the waterproofing adds extra weight. Were it not for the ergonomic design, detectorists not accustomed to the weight of these machines might tire quickly. The supplied sling is easy to use, adjust, and offers a fair way to alleviate some of the weight, but I found it uncomfortable for long periods of use. Many avid detectorists use after-market harness systems, so you may want to check out those options if you plan to spend long days detecting.

In the field, the Deepseeker performed exceptionally well. The unit demonstrated almost complete immunity to all but the worst hot rocks I encountered. The ground balance and multi-speed ground tracking worked great, but I found that I rarely used the ground tracking as the ATX handled most of the soil mineralization in the OFF position. The threshold was quick to respond to ground changes and a simple ground balance was all that was needed to bring the ATX back into maximum depth and sensitivity. The Iron Check works well, maybe even too well! I dig everything no matter what and I have had a very successful nugget-hunting career doing just that. I have found good targets under junk on many occasions. Be careful and mindful that gold, like junk, is where you find it and there is no law of detecting that states there will be no gold under junk!

Regardless of your level of detecting expertise, it will take some time to get comfortable with all the functions and navigating the menus of the ATX. With multi-button presses to access some functions, it's important to take time to learn the machine well beyond the quick-start level. Overall, Garrett has created a PI detector that is extremely well made with solid functionality. The ATX offers great value for your dollar. Garrett has again carved a niche in the metal detector market, and the ATX perfectly has met the needs expressed by detectorists worldwide..."

You can find Kevin's complete field test review on pages 16-19 of the November/December 2014 issue of Gold Prospectors Magazine, or download the .pdf here.  You can also get more information and watch a video of the Garrett ATX Deepseeker Metal Detector on this website.

Posted by: Denise AT 06:00 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Saturday, May 03 2014

The abbreviation kHz stands for ”kilohertz” which is the measurement of radio frequency radiation. A Hertz is the unit of measurement for counts per unit of time. Frequency is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit time. The higher the frequency, the more waves travel through space during a given time
frame.

Garrett Metal DetectorThere are two general types of metal detectors: Pulse Induction (PI) and Very Low Frequency (VLF). The major difference between PI and VLF is the ability for the machine to discriminate targets. Keep in mind that a detector does not actually detect metal directly. It detects magnetic fields. A detector “hears” the waves of electromagnetic radiation or radio frequency radiation through a coil. When switched on, a VLF detector first creates a magnetic field and energizes anything in the ground that responds to a magnetic field. Next, your detector seeks to find a magnetic field that has a response to its initial magnetic field. Because metals conduct electricity, they respond to a magnetic field and generate a small magnetic field of their own. Detectors detect the secondary magnetic field that conductive targets create whey they are energized by the first magnetic field sent into the ground by your detector. In general, the larger the metallic target, the larger and longer and stronger its magnetic response will be.

PI (pulse induction) detectors work a bit differently by putting magnetic field energy into the ground and then switching off and waiting a short period before they start to look for a response. This makes them better at handling ground mineralization than a VLF machine because during that short delay the magnetic response of iron trash minerals that you don't want to find dies out, but the signal from tiny bits of buried gold does, too. VLF detectors are more sensitive to finding the smallest bits of gold, but do not as easily cancel out ground mineralization.

If you've been shopping for a metal detector, you might have noticed that the manufacturers list the kHz of each machine. But how do you know if a higher or lower frequency is better? In most situations, a few kHz one way or the other will have a negligible impact on performance out in the field. The importance of frequency is most noticed when you are hunting for one particular type of treasure over another. For example, if you are coin shooting at the park, you can opt for a lower frequency metal detector which will cost less. However, if your main objective is to find gold nuggets with your detector, consider a higher frequency machine such as the Fisher Gold Bug 2 or Garrett AT Gold.

Posted by: Denise AT 07:29 am   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Sunday, December 01 2013

Dry washers are like highbankers except they do not use water to recover gold. While wet processing is nearly always faster and more efficient, especially for fine gold, dry washers are the best tool for recovering gold nuggets, pickers, and flakes from dry materials in the desert or other areas where water is not plentiful.

dry washerDrywashers are operated by shoveling gold-bearing gravels into an upper box which is covered with a screen. The larger rocks that are too big to pass through the screen slide off. Gravel small enough to go through is fed down into the lower gold recovery box, which is an inclined trough with cross riffles much like a sluice. The bottom of the recovery box consists of a thin, light-weight porous cloth. Beneath the riffle box is a blower that pulses air up through the cloth. The vibrations and air flow, combined with the shaking and classifying action of the dry washer allows the gold to settle to the bottom where it is captured in the riffles.

Keep these tips and tricks in mind when using a dry washer:

• Moist soils and clay cause problems, so be sure to crush lumps of clay and dry your dirt in the sun (plastic tarps are ideal) before running through your dry washer. Surface soils might seem dry, but if you dig down a few inches, you may find moisture in the soil that will cause your sand, gravel, and gold to stick together.

• Double-check all the "throw away" rocks. Scanning them with a metal detector is a great way to ensure you're not tossing aside gold-laden rocks. Also, don't assume old tailings piles have been totally worked out. This is  another time to use a metal detector because ordinary rocks could be  laced with gold and completely over-looked by earlier prospectors.


• Consider using a dry gold vacuum to clean out crevices in bedrock. Feed the material that you sucked up into your vacuum bucket into your dry washer.


• Drywashing can be a very dusty process, so try to stay upwind as much as possible and wear a dust mask.
• Do a clean up every couple of hours, or after processing roughly one to two yards of material.

Looking for a drywasher? The Gold Buddy brand is available in 4 sizes and also check out the new heavy duty
Gold Storm dry washer. Whichever you choose, SAVE $10 with coupon code TAKETEN at check out. Offer expires Dec. 31, 2103.

Posted by: Denise AT 06:14 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Thursday, November 14 2013

If you've been prospecting for gold using a pan, sluice, highbanker or other traditional piece of equipment, there's another tool you may want to consider— a metal detector. Gold detectors are not necessarily higher in cost than an all-purpose detector, but they are built with a higher sensitivity to pinpointing pieces of gold, and have better ground balancing and discrimination abilities.   

gold metal detectorIf you're not familiar with metal detecting, the first thing you should know is that your detector does not actually detect metal directly. It detects magnetic fields. When switched on, your VLF (very low frequency) detector first creates a magnetic field and energizes anything in the ground that responds to a magnetic field. Next, your detector seeks to find a magnetic field that has a response to its initial magnetic field. Because metals conduct electricity, they respond to a magnetic field and generate a small magnetic field of their own. Detectors detect the secondary magnetic field that conductive targets create whey they are energized by the first magnetic field sent into the ground by your detector. In general, the larger the metallic target, the larger and longer and stronger its magnetic response will be.

PI (pulse induction) detectors work a bit differently by putting magnetic field energy into the ground and then switching off and waiting a very short period before they start to look for a response. This makes them better at handling ground mineralization than a VLF detector because during that short delay the magnetic response of iron trash minerals that you don't want to find dies out, but the signal from tiny bits of buried gold does, too. VLF detectors are more sensitive to finding the smallest bits of gold, but do not as easily cancel out ground mineralization.

Read more how-to info and articles here.

Posted by: Denise AT 12:15 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
Friday, November 01 2013

At first glance, metal detecting seems like the least demanding form of prospecting for gold. But it has its share of challenges, too, just like sluicing, drywashing, or panning by hand. Whether you've been swinging a metal detector for years, or just purchased your first machine, there might be a few things you could do to increase your chances of uncovering a piece of buried gold.  metal detector 

• Properly tune your detector. Whether it's a $200 or a $5,000 model, the settings are important to get right -- especially Ground Balancing and Gain/Sensitivity. Goldfields are usually heavily mineralized, which can make it really frustrating to know a false target from a real one, so follow the manufacturer's directions for ground balancing and do it often. Ideally, the Gain/Sensitivity is run as high as possible while maintaining a stable threshold as you swing. Try pumping your coil up and down during ground balancing.

• Control the Coil. The coil should be kept level and close to the ground from one end of your swing to the other. If your swing arcs and the coil is coming off the ground several inches on the ends, you may get false signals and lose a lot of depth. Also, don't swing too slowly. A Pulse Induction (PI)  detector performs better with a slower swing, but a Very Low Frequency (VLF) machine needs to be swung faster to detect targets.

• Target Recovery. If you have ever "lost" a target after you first heard it, try this: after pinpointing, start digging until you have moved a small pile of dirt. Pass the material from your pile, one scoop or handful at a time, over the TOP of the coil. You will have better target recovery if you move the target first.

Gold detectors are not necessarily higher in cost, but they are built with a higher sensitivity to detecting gold nuggets, have better ground balancing and discrimination abilities. Reading your owners' manual cannot be stressed enough. Once you know how to use your detector, then practice makes perfect. Sometimes success comes after just making a few small adjustments and getting out in the field as often as you can. If you're shopping for a gold detector, click here for ideas.  Good luck and have fun!

Nugget of News Blog

Posted by: Denise AT 07:00 pm   |  Permalink   |  1 Comment  |  Email
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